Archive for the ‘games we play’ Category

Bedroom cricket

Gabe

Gabe and Robin invented the format during the summer holiday – a concession to activity when they were at their most idle. The three of us play (Eliza and L, on occasions, too) but more commonly now it’s Gabe and me. The playing area is the length of Robin’s bedroom. We use a windball and a size 2 bat. Most ingeniously, the stumps are a pair of jeans hung from mattress tipped on its side.

Robin’s carpet makes the game. It takes turn – Warne-like turn for the well-spun delivery. And, given that there is no straight-arm restriction on ‘bowling’ the game is all about turning the ball, or as a batsman, countering that turn. 

Robin

Returning home from work, it might be thirty minutes before Robin registers my presence and appears. Usually, he’s in the living room or his bedroom, interacting with his phone. Recently, I reminded him that when he was younger he would run to the hall when he heard me come in the door from work and hug my knees. “Really?” He said. “I’ll do that again.” True to his word, last week, one evening as I came in the front-door, Robin burst from the living room and hugged me. Possibly, a little ironically, but appreciated nonetheless. 

Eliza

Eliza hosted a sleepover of gymnastics friends. It followed a gymnastics evening, which may have raised hopes that the girls would be tired. We set up two single and a double mattress for the five friends to sleep on in the living room. The rest of the family went upstairs to bed. The girls’ chatter and laughter carried on. Around midnight, the first text from upstairs was sent to Eliza, instructing her to quieten her guests. More agitated texts followed as the hours passed. Eventually, after 3am there was silence in the house.

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Bordeaux week 2 – surf dudes and card sharks

Four of us left early(-ish) one morning to head for the Atlantic coast. Gabe, beach unfriendly, stayed at the gite. 75 minutes drive later, we parked, walked through a pine wood and dunes onto a long, wide beach. I discussed the possibility of a surfing lesson in French and then in English with Vincent, a lean, tanned surfer. Eliza and Robin were given clammy wet suits and waited for the rest of Vincent’s class. Eventually, he said they could start. 

For the next 90 minutes, as the tide swelled inwards, Robin and Eliza went from lying on the board to picking themselves up and standing, if only for a few seconds, as waves swept them towards the beach. “The best thing of my 13 years” said Eliza. Robin was just as enthusiastic.

Every night, we settled around the table to play cards. Whist, contract whist, black two, hearts, etc. Gabe had a lordly air, playing to win and controlling the music. We were each asked for a track, which he might censor, before calling up on Spotify and certainly criticise once it was playing. The cards games were keenly competitive, verging on the unfriendly. Robin, tired and less adept, was heckled for holding up play or teased for poor judgement. The edge to the evening was broken when we wrapped up the game and headed to bed.

New Year’s Eve games

Spending New Year’s Eve together at home, we decided to play games. The children turned the opportunity for some family fun into a contest. Points were awarded for positions in each game and an overall tally kept.

We started with the alphabet game – naming things of different categories (boy’s name, girl’s name, shop, city, musician, etc) beginning with a selected letter. Gabe and Eliza scrapped over definitions and rules, trying to undermine the other’s efforts with unwarranted ferocity. Robin kept up a running commentary of the categories for which he couldn’t think of anything – which was most. L won this round.

We moved to kitchen table table-tennis. Robin battled to second place behind Gabe, who was unbeaten, despite being taken into extra-time by Robin and L.

Round three was pairs (a memory game, involving picking pairs of cards from a pack spread face-down). Gabe bailed out and Robin played half-heartedly. Eliza was thwarted in the first game as she, L and I drew, but could not be resisted as her fierce concentration brought victory in the second game. It was now well past eleven o’clock.

As midnight neared, Eliza went into the garden to watch the local fireworks. L and Gabe watched the coverage from London on TV. Robin asked to be taken to bed and read to. “It will be exactly the same fireworks as last year,” he reasoned.

Christmas presents

The focus was stronger than ever on the presents the kids were getting each other, and L and me. They exchanged chocolate, and delegated some decisions to L. But there was also more adventure. Robin and Gabe both bought clothes (tops) for Eliza. Gabe rushed into a shop and grabbed the top he understood Eliza to have wanted, selecting the size based on the sticker on the hanger. Presumably he nodded when the assistant confirmed he wanted age 14-15. He is now challenged with finding the receipt so an exchange for a smaller size can be effected.

We were at Grandpa’s in Scotland and did our present-opening there mid-morning. Notable, amongst the wrapping paper, by its absence was football. For the first time in many years, there were no boots, shirts or even footballs given or received. After a meal for 11, we played Bird Bingo and Headbands (iphone version)

Football did come to the fore on Boxing Day when Uncle S/R took the boys and me to see the only Scottish League match being played that day: Dunfirmline v Falkirk. There was some discussion over which was worse – the quality of football or the hot chocolate. We all wondered how the man of the match adjudicator could have come to any decision.

The following day, we had a kickabout on a basketball court with Cousin F, before walking from South Queensferry to the middle of the Forth Road Bridge and back.

30 day challenge

Eliza has joined L and me on (so far) two 30 day challenges with escalating physical demands. First, we did ‘abs and squats’ and now we’re attempting an arm strength challenge. We get together in the evening for that day’s exercise. Eliza goes first, so she can finish first. She does the exercises frenetically, pitching her torso up and down with sit-ups, not with the control I would expect of her as a gymnast. The fourth and final daily arm exercise is shadow boxing. Eliza thrashes her arms, getting quite uppity at the futility of the exercise and liking one of us to hold a pillow that she can flail at. 

Robin has played in his second cup final of the year, this time representing school. His team won all six matches, barely conceding a goal and with Robin leading scorer with 11. He has, I’m told, impressed playing alongside his friend and Man Utd academy player, Big L. 

The Beatles continue to be Gabe’s favourite band – to listen to and to play on the piano (Lady Madonna, at the moment). But he’s allowing other long defunct groups into his listening repertoire: Bowie, the Kinks, the Rolling Stones and most surprisingly, the Smiths. He’s interested in which songs L and I like, encouraging us to add them to Spotify playlists (the subscription for which he convinced us to buy). He’ll listen to our choices, but hand down his own judgement on the correctness of our taste. 

Calci

Two weeks holiday in a villa situated on a farm in a valley outside Pisa.

Robin

Robin inhabited the pool as much as he did the villa. He took every opportunity to be there and then stretched that opportunity to the maximum. Of a uniform depth, Robin could on tiptoes just stand with this face, tilted upwards, out of the water. Hour after hour he immersed himself. Gliding, twisting and spinning like an otter in the water – his favourite manoeuvre was a backwards turn under water. Then batting a ball around, or wrestling a lilo. And always diving or pitching himself back into the pool.

Gabe

Gabe was more taken by the charms of the villa. He lay on its sofas in the red-tiled living room for hours, particularly through the morning and early afternoon. He read To Kill a Mocking Bird and Harper Lee’s sequel in long spells of intense concentration. He surfed on his phone, listened to music and by the second week there was the Olympics, through the lens of Italian TV.

But he was more sociable than last year and when he came to the pool he orchestrated games – happily and unashamedly competitive.

Eliza

Eliza inhabited a middle ground: reading and playing on her phone at the villa, but more easily drawn to the pool than Gabe. There she sat on the side of the pool, often with a book as an excuse not to get in and face the shortlived cold shock. But once in the pool she joined in with Robin and they played together as they have done for nearly ten years. Eliza even took part in the one bounce games of footie beside the pool.

Having swum and splashed for a while, Eliza loved to lie on the red stone that surrounded the pool, soaking up rays from the sun and heat from below, leaving a damp body imprint on the stone that she would jump up from after a few minutes to admire.

Long and short of Christmas

The kids longed for Christmas. Each school day they willed the term to end. Every morning they counted one fewer day until the big one. The allure and magic seems to have survived their getting older and wiser.

Gabe was the most organised about what he wanted, drawing up a long list, none of it extravagant, qualified with a note that he didn’t expect it all. Robin’s was shorter and more ambitious/ less likely to be fulfilled. Eliza the most indecisive.

Eliza also caused consternation, by repeatedly floating the idea that, after their stockings were opened on Christmas morning, no more presents should be opened until the afternoon. She gloried in her preference for deferred gratification and the pain it caused her brothers. She was out-voted.

There was a stronger onus on the presents they would buy for each other and L & me than there had been in the past. Eliza was the best organised, followed by Gabe and then Robin, who left things late. Gabe had a ruse for Robin. He made him a plain Christmas card and handed it to him as a present. He was going to wait to see Robin try to look grateful or disappointed, before handing him his real present. Humanely, on the day, he didn’t leave Robin much time to digest the plain card, before handing over the present.

On Christmas morning, we went to the local park, for a play while the rain held off. Eliza, Robin and I played frisbee across the big field. Robin tore after the disc pulling off amazing collections at full tilt. Eliza threw and caught the frisbee with new found alacrity.

Gabe led the indoor games: Apples and Apples (where he favoured sarcastic verbal connections) and cards, with contract whist a new favourite.

A couple of days after Christmas, family and friends from the Wirral, meant a happy household of 14. Robin’s trumpet playing was mentioned, a request made for a performance and without speaking he went to his trumpet case, took out the instrument, found his music and began to play. Facing away from his audience, he hit every note cleanly and clearly and left the room, again without speaking, to our applause.