Archive for the ‘sports’ Category

Braces (at last)

Eliza

“When are you 14?” asked the Greek orthodontist.

“November,” Eliza replied.

“Well, we had better get on with it,” concluded the orthodontist.

Eliza gave a look that said, ‘FINALLY!’. This is either her third or fourth orthodontist appointment in between which she has been batted back and forth, without anything being done to correct her crooked front teeth. But this time there is urgency and action. It takes under 10 seconds for the orthodontist to affirm that the wonkiness of her upper incisors qualifies for NHS care. By the time we have returned to the reception desk, a further appointment has been requested – for the following day.

Eliza is back at the surgery in not much more than 24 hours. This time, she leaves with braces across her four upper front teeth. The braces will stay for six months, re-aligning those teeth. After that, she will wear upper and lower jaw plates for up to two years.

Robin

As a cricketer Robin has shown more as a natural bowler than batsman. This season, his bowling has gone a little backwards, without, until this week, his batting compensating. In fact, despite often being requested to play twice a week – for his age group and the age group above – Robin has been a reluctant cricketer. But on Monday, he rediscovered his joy in the game, by making his first ever score of 25, which is the retirement score in under 11 cricket. He hit several fours, including one that he described as going back over the bowler and bouncing on the boundary rope.

Gabe

Gabe finished his GCSE exams, but chose not to go out to celebrate. Instead he came back home and in the evening was still in his school uniform, which he’ll never need to wear again. He reported feeling no great release from finishing his exams. His thoughts have turned instead to the results, which are almost two whole months away.

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Eleven (at the cinema)

Robin

Robin had his least active ever birthday party. Friday after school, with four friends, Eliza and her friend, he went to the Trafford Centre for a burger and chips tea and then to the cinema to watch ‘Sing’. There was some FIFA on his x-box at home and then the party was over. He grinned throughout.

The weekend before, we had taken Robin and his friend A into Manchester to a skateboarding shop. There, he handed over his list of components and the shop assembled the board in front of him. It took three attempts as the first two times the components were faulty. He used the board the next day and found it much lighter than the ones he borrowed at the skate centre. He keeps it in his room where he practices slow-motion manoeuvres on his thick carpet.

Gabe

Gabe’s mock exams went well, with some very good scores in French, maths, history and food tech. But his results didn’t accord with how well he thought the exams had gone. English literature, for example, was several grades below his expectations. Given his reluctance to revise, it is better that he didn’t get A*’s across the board. There should be some recognition that he will have to work hard to get the results he wants this summer.

In the meantime, Gabe has been selecting A Level subjects. Music and politics were each considered, but he has opted for French, history and English literature. There is a wrinkle: in the way the options are currently configured, he cannot combine the history course he prefers with the other two subjects. This has been raised with the school, but Gabe has conceded he will take the less preferred history course if he has to.

Eliza

Eliza made her school competitive debut – in netball. She has been attending netball practice for a few months. She enjoyed her first match and hopes she will be selected again. She recounted a moment in the match when she, playing goal defence, leaped and intercepted a pass. Two passes and few seconds later, her team-mates up the court had scored a goal – one of only three in the match.

Birthday celebration: parts 1, 2 & 3

Eliza

Eliza became a teen two weeks ago, but has continued the celebrations. We had a family meal out on her birthday night. She had a visit to Manchester’s new trampoline centre and a sleepover with her best friend a few days later. Last Saturday she had a joint birthday meal and cinema trip with school friends. A further sleepover with school friends may yet occur.

The joint birthday event had a dramatic start. Lucy, whose birthday was also being celebrated, set her own hair on fire at the table in the restaurant by leaning too close to a small candle. L made ready to douse her in water, but Lucy’s Dad patted out the flames with his hands. He’s an anaesthetist and apparently quite used to doing this in theatre. Lucy, Eliza and their friends continued the evening, although Eliza did say the smell of burnt hair was horrible.

Robin

From YouTube clips, Robin has developed an interest in basketball and, more specifically, the NBA. He knows the names of a few of the stars and a few more of the teams. A primary school tournament has given him the chance to play competitively for the first time. Undefeated in their first afternoon’s games, his team qualified for the final. There they came out on top, completing a double of school football and basketball champions. Robin’s role was in defence, allowing him to take long-shots. ‘3-pointers,’ as he said, ‘even though they only count as 2 points.’

Gabe

Gabe has completed two important elements of his music GCSE: recorded performance and composition. His performance piece was Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. On the appointed day, he played the piece twice, while his music teacher recorded it for the examiner. Each rendition included one mistake, so he was given another chance, early in the morning the following week. I dropped him at school to make sure he was there in time. Ten minutes later, it was wrapped up, with a faultless performance recorded and sent to the examiner.

Atypical teen

Gabe

Two colleagues have season tickets for City in the family stand. They qualify for tickets there because they take their nephew. This 14 year old is in a full-on teen awkward spell, which includes not wanting to go to football matches. Hence, I was asked if Gabe would like to go with them. Gabe accepted.

And so there have been rave reviews of what a fine chap Gabe is. He was great company, happy to chat, a pleasure to be with, would he like to come again?

Indeed Gabe has been very good company in recent weeks, all through Christmas and into the New Year. Much has changed and will be changing for him at this time. But one factor was that he broke his mobile phone before Christmas by knocking it into the toilet. He had to wait for Christmas to accumulate the funds to replace it, which he did by upgrading to an iPhone. I shared this observation with him. He agreed that he would spend less time on his phone. That would make him an atypical teen.

Eliza

Eliza has a cause: the French spelling bee. The paper on which the words she must learn are printed is crumpled with use. ‘Test me!’ she implores and delights in remembering the French words, and even more in spelling them with the letters in French: double-vay; y-grec, etc.

Robin

Our sodden winter turned cold for a weekend. On a walk by a canal the kids bounced stones along the iced surface, listening to the ethereal plimp noise made by the skimming, skidding stones. Then tried to hurl stones through the ice.

Even better, it snowed the following night. Robin was awake at 7am and by 7.30 had sized up the conditions. ‘Come to my room’ he begged, wanting us to open the curtains and behold a snowy garden. He woke Eliza, dressed, gulped some breakfast and then was out in the garden. For 45 minutes, there were snowballs and a snowman. He came in for more breakfast and soon after that the melt was happening.

 

Referee (in training)

Gabe

As part of his PE GCSE, Gabe has been doing a refereeing course. Three whole weekend days – one forcing him to miss a club football match. The draw, as well fulfilling his course, is the prospect of money: £15 per game refereed. His view on the course, though, is uncomplimentary. Slow, boring, obvious has been his assessment. Having watched about an hour of the instruction, I sympathise. They seemed to be spending that amount of time practising shaking hands with the captains and tossing the coin. Later on, Gabe got to do some practice match refereeing. He reports that he did well, but couldn’t blow his whistle properly – at the right times, he clarified, just not blown properly. He has to complete five observed matches, before his qualification is complete. 

Eliza

Eliza has had two trips away from home in the space of a week. Firstly, the final days of her first half-term at grammar school was spent on a residential course in North Wales. Two days and nights with new friends didn’t faze her. She enjoyed the outdoor activities, the evening games and the dorm room chat. 

The highlight of her half-term holiday was an overnight trip to Blackpool for her friend E’s birthday. Fish and chips, roller-coaster, the illuminations, hotel swimming pool all featured, but having three beds to choose from in the hotel room was appreciated the most. 

Robin

Robin completed a six week Cheshire cricket coaching course. He has picked up and retained technique tips that might have been offered at the club but tend to drift by in the noise there. He is particularly pleased with understanding how to grip the ball and flex his wrist to bowl faster. The coaches nominated him for the advanced course that follows, but Robin didn’t feel the need for another course. 

Camp

Gabe

Gabe joined 90% of his school year on a five day camping trip that rounded off his term. We heard nothing from him for the whole week and didn’t know what to expect when he came back from his first ever experience of camping. 

He was tired, but generally positive about the camp when he got back. The worst point had been sleeping one night, not under canvas, but shelters that they had made themselves. Gabe said he didn’t sleep at all. He was also unimpressed at his friends’ lack of cleanliness. Unlike them, he had changed his socks and pants daily. The food was also disappointing. Still, though, he had enjoyed the week. Would he like to go camping again, I wondered. “No”, was the clear answer. 

Eliza

Eliza’s final weeks of junior school were occupied by play rehearsals, shows, a school disco, talent show, spelling bee and various other activities that are part of the rounding up of a pupil’s education before they head to secondary school. 

Come the day of the talent show, Eliza turned to L at the school gate and said, “I’ve forgotten my costume.” 

“What costume?”

But before, L needed to rush home to find this costume, Eliza’s best friend appeared: “Don’t worry. I brought a spare costume, in case Eliza forgot hers.” 

Eliza sat and passed her grade 3 violin exam and at the leavers’ assembly, she was awarded the school music prize for her contribution to the school orchestra and recorder Group. 

Robin

Robin was awarded the coaches’ player of the season award at his football team’s presentation evening. He tried to look nonchalant, jaw jutting and unsmiling, but L was aware that he was nervous beforehand, betraying a hope or expectation that he might be a trophy winner. The coaches gave each player marks out of ten for various skills and likened each player to a professional footballer. Robin, they said, is like Edin Hazard for his ability to “tear opposing defenders to bits.”

Summer term

Gabe

Gabe had a late birthday party, go-karting. Each of his five friends was at least as tall as I am. They filled the dining room and garden. At the race track they were installed in adult karts, unlike the birthday boy, who had a relatively under-powered junior vehicle.

Gabe has been doing food technology this term and it is one of his GCSE choices. Each Sunday evening, he announces that he must find his ingredients. Each Sunday evening, he is told it is too late and that he has had all week to sort out his shopping. We seem stuck in this cycle. I hope his GCSE lesson won’t take place on a Monday.

Eliza

Eliza had her induction day at the Grammar School. It went well. She liked her teacher; the same teacher as Gabe had in his first year at the school. She was also pleased to note that she wasn’t the shortest in her class.

Eliza’s year six play is a musical spoof of Robin Hood. She plays a village-idiot type character, with lots of jokey lines. But she knows almost the entire play, having a real facility for memorising dialogue. She has also taken to the catchy tunes which she has been singing around the house for weeks. The first performance went very well and she carried of her role successfully, speaking clearly and winning lots of laughs.

Robin

Robin has been doing swimming lessons at school, which he has been very keen on. He has learnt new strokes, had to swim in pyjamas and finished by completing a distance swim, although he couldn’t remember how many lengths were involved.