Posts Tagged ‘birthday party’

Inflatabirthday

Robin

Robin’s birthday came and so did his agonisingly chosen guests – three from his new school, two from his old. They had an hour at Inflatanation – bouncing in a warehouse of inflated shapes. Two mobile phones were lost and both found. At home, sitting down for tea, without the outlet of physical activity, some awkwardness returned, but fortunately new friend T is garrulous and kept the chatter going. Robin was happy with his birthday, signing off with a sleepover for old friend A. A week later, and Robin has invited his first school friend, M, home after school, and they had a kickabout in the garden.

Eliza

Eliza’s school PE class was set a challenge: do as many sit-ups as you can, keeping time with a ticking clock. Eliza stopped in the 80s, but could have continued. She was conscious that the rest of the class, all having given up, were looking at her. Her legs were a bit wobbly afterwards, she conceded.

Gabe

Gabe has been making slow progress with his 5,000 word extended essay (aka EPQ), on 60s music and social change, which is due for submission in March. He asked me to read the first 1,500 words. He is stuck trying to unpick what was a cause of social change and what was an example of social change. Access to abortion, he points out, was a social change and created social change. ‘Spot on’, I reply. But he wants certainty and clarity not real world ambiguity.

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Fourteen

Eliza

A teacher training day fell on the day after Eliza’s birthday giving her the perfect opportunity for an evening birthday party at home. Seven or eight friends arrived – one girl as tall as I am. They sat and chatted in high-pitched voices, laughed, ate pizza, played with their phones, occasionally bust into song, accompanying something being played on someone’s phone. It was a great success.

Gabe

Gabe attended GCSE awards evening where he and his classmates collected their exam certificates. A local MP and school alumna gave the address. Gabe received a faculty award. It could only have been more unlikely had it been Food Tech. It turned out that the boy who lies around for hour after hour, shirks exercise and has left his GCSE courses much less fit than he started, won the PE award.

Robin

Robin, following Gabe’s lead, returns from school and keeps wearing his school uniform through the evening. Even when we’re going out, as we did tonight to Eliza’s gymnastics competition, he chooses to keep on his blazer, tie and trousers. When finally, it’s time to get ready for bed, the blazer comes off and is tossed to the floor. L & I are trying, without much impact, to instil in him the habit of removing his blazer and hanging it up.

Eleven (at the cinema)

Robin

Robin had his least active ever birthday party. Friday after school, with four friends, Eliza and her friend, he went to the Trafford Centre for a burger and chips tea and then to the cinema to watch ‘Sing’. There was some FIFA on his x-box at home and then the party was over. He grinned throughout.

The weekend before, we had taken Robin and his friend A into Manchester to a skateboarding shop. There, he handed over his list of components and the shop assembled the board in front of him. It took three attempts as the first two times the components were faulty. He used the board the next day and found it much lighter than the ones he borrowed at the skate centre. He keeps it in his room where he practices slow-motion manoeuvres on his thick carpet.

Gabe

Gabe’s mock exams went well, with some very good scores in French, maths, history and food tech. But his results didn’t accord with how well he thought the exams had gone. English literature, for example, was several grades below his expectations. Given his reluctance to revise, it is better that he didn’t get A*’s across the board. There should be some recognition that he will have to work hard to get the results he wants this summer.

In the meantime, Gabe has been selecting A Level subjects. Music and politics were each considered, but he has opted for French, history and English literature. There is a wrinkle: in the way the options are currently configured, he cannot combine the history course he prefers with the other two subjects. This has been raised with the school, but Gabe has conceded he will take the less preferred history course if he has to.

Eliza

Eliza made her school competitive debut – in netball. She has been attending netball practice for a few months. She enjoyed her first match and hopes she will be selected again. She recounted a moment in the match when she, playing goal defence, leaped and intercepted a pass. Two passes and few seconds later, her team-mates up the court had scored a goal – one of only three in the match.

Birthday celebration: parts 1, 2 & 3

Eliza

Eliza became a teen two weeks ago, but has continued the celebrations. We had a family meal out on her birthday night. She had a visit to Manchester’s new trampoline centre and a sleepover with her best friend a few days later. Last Saturday she had a joint birthday meal and cinema trip with school friends. A further sleepover with school friends may yet occur.

The joint birthday event had a dramatic start. Lucy, whose birthday was also being celebrated, set her own hair on fire at the table in the restaurant by leaning too close to a small candle. L made ready to douse her in water, but Lucy’s Dad patted out the flames with his hands. He’s an anaesthetist and apparently quite used to doing this in theatre. Lucy, Eliza and their friends continued the evening, although Eliza did say the smell of burnt hair was horrible.

Robin

From YouTube clips, Robin has developed an interest in basketball and, more specifically, the NBA. He knows the names of a few of the stars and a few more of the teams. A primary school tournament has given him the chance to play competitively for the first time. Undefeated in their first afternoon’s games, his team qualified for the final. There they came out on top, completing a double of school football and basketball champions. Robin’s role was in defence, allowing him to take long-shots. ‘3-pointers,’ as he said, ‘even though they only count as 2 points.’

Gabe

Gabe has completed two important elements of his music GCSE: recorded performance and composition. His performance piece was Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. On the appointed day, he played the piece twice, while his music teacher recorded it for the examiner. Each rendition included one mistake, so he was given another chance, early in the morning the following week. I dropped him at school to make sure he was there in time. Ten minutes later, it was wrapped up, with a faultless performance recorded and sent to the examiner.

Flight time birthday

Robin

As a birthday treat, we took Robin to the Trafford Park free-fall centre. Twice, for 60 seconds, he stepped into a wind tower, assisted by an instructor and was suspended in the air as if he had jumped from an aeroplane thousands of feet above the ground. He was fearless and enthralled.

Two days later, for his party, he was again airborne. This time at JumpNation, the trampoline centre, with a group of five friends, plus Eliza and her best friend.

The birthday week is over now, and his feet are back on the ground.

Eliza

Back in the summer, on Father’s Day, Eliza presented me with a special cheque book, filled with vouchers. She reminded me recently that I hadn’t used them. I remembered today and tore out the ‘clean my shoes’ voucher. She looked irritated at my choice of timing, but when I came back from cricket practice this afternoon, my work boots were waiting at the front door, clean and shiny, with a note on them: “Happy?”

Gabe

Gabe’s musical interests are diverging. On the one hand, there’s classical. On the other, he’s interested in indie music, preferring Radio X to Capital; on a third hand he’s consuming and performing the Beatles. Imagine is his favourite piano piece and gets played most days at a variety of tempos and sometimes with members of the family singing Lennon’s words at his shoulder.

Chocolate party

Eliza

Eliza had agonised over how to celebrate her 12th birthday. She couldn’t figure out how to balance her new school friends with her old. The solution came with a joint party with a new school friend and a sleepover with her best friend.

The joint party, in a local church hall, featured Oliver the chocolatier teaching ten attentive girls how to make truffles and other chocolate goodies. The group sat for an hour, chatting quietly and engrossed in the activity. When it was finished they picked from a buffet eating a fraction of the quantity of pizza our kids eat (and so a fraction of the pizza bought for the occasion). After tea they arranged their own games. Both sets of parents observed, praised, offered food but had very little to do with a group of self-possessed youngsters.

Robin

Robin was in a bad mood leading up to Eliza’s party. He had wanted to watch either the City match or El Classico, but both clashed with the chocolate party. Worse was to come when I offered Gabe the chance to go to the City match with friends, without extending the offer to Robin. City were one down before we left home. Robin was unimpressed and lapsed into exaggerated Manchester footy-speak as we listened to his team go further behind in the car on the way to the party.

Gabe

Monday nights, Gabe spends an hour with a German tutor. Prevented by school from studying more than one modern language, L & I arranged private tuition (the school has agreed to enter him in the exam) to enable Gabe to work towards a GCSE in German. He seems to enjoy the 1-1 lessons in our kitchen and, each week, L supplements this by working with him on vocabulary.

 

Summer term

Gabe

Gabe had a late birthday party, go-karting. Each of his five friends was at least as tall as I am. They filled the dining room and garden. At the race track they were installed in adult karts, unlike the birthday boy, who had a relatively under-powered junior vehicle.

Gabe has been doing food technology this term and it is one of his GCSE choices. Each Sunday evening, he announces that he must find his ingredients. Each Sunday evening, he is told it is too late and that he has had all week to sort out his shopping. We seem stuck in this cycle. I hope his GCSE lesson won’t take place on a Monday.

Eliza

Eliza had her induction day at the Grammar School. It went well. She liked her teacher; the same teacher as Gabe had in his first year at the school. She was also pleased to note that she wasn’t the shortest in her class.

Eliza’s year six play is a musical spoof of Robin Hood. She plays a village-idiot type character, with lots of jokey lines. But she knows almost the entire play, having a real facility for memorising dialogue. She has also taken to the catchy tunes which she has been singing around the house for weeks. The first performance went very well and she carried of her role successfully, speaking clearly and winning lots of laughs.

Robin

Robin has been doing swimming lessons at school, which he has been very keen on. He has learnt new strokes, had to swim in pyjamas and finished by completing a distance swim, although he couldn’t remember how many lengths were involved.