Posts Tagged ‘Call of Duty’

Spider in the corner house

Robin

Robin has developed a particular taste in buildings and houses. New or recently built homes find his favour. He has a specific dislike for exposed brickwork. Of two identical houses next to each other, he’ll praise the one with rendered exterior, but not the one with its bricks left open to the world. He has no fondness for old houses. Our own home almost comes into that category, although he likes the dining room and living room. Asked what he has against old houses and he will explain that they are ‘spider in the corner’ homes.

Eliza

Eliza came second in the French spelling bee competition, representing her form in front of the whole of year seven. She practised assiduously for weeks, moving to races against the clock to see how many words (numbers, days, countries, animals, adjectives about personality) she could pronounce and spell correctly in 6o seconds: “lundi, el oo en day ee” etc. She managed 17 at the contest, losing to a twin with a multinational background, and presumably an advantage in all foreign language activity.

Gabe

Gabe still spends a significant chunk of his time at home playing on his Xbox. He has lobbied furiously to be allowed to play Call of Duty like all his friends – and responded furiously when time and again, L and I have refused. He alleges that our intransigence is making him unpopular.

He is allowed to play Halo, another shooting game, but which has a 16 rating, not 18. It has displaced FIFA as his preferred game. We can usually hear him playing as he’s communicating – laughing and chatting – with his friends on multi-player mode, not sounding unpopular at all.

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Macbeth

Gabe

L, Gabe & went to the cinema on Saturday night. It is an old picture house recently re-opened after refurbishment, featuring crushed velvet upholstered seats, sofas and bar refreshments. The film was Macbeth, Gabe’s GCSE Shakespeare text. During the film, he whispered from time-to-time with L. At the end he was effusive – highlighting the delivery of Macbeth’s soliloquies, changes in location of scenes compared to the play, scenes cut from the film version, as well as maintaining with L an intellectually impressive discussion of the film’s broader meaning. 

Robin

Three years ago, we had to manage a situation at a sleep-over where Gabe’s friends were going to be playing the 16 rated video game, Call of Duty. It’s a problem that has recurred as most of his friends are allowed to play that and similar games, while L and I have not dropped our opposition. Now Robin, two years younger than Gabe when we first faced this issue, reports that the boys at an afternoon party he attended were playing Call of Duty. He avoided it, he explained to me, giving the sense that he understood it was not something he should be seeing. 

Eliza

For all Eliza’s impressive academic record and progress, her lack of general knowledge is exposed by the wider curriculum of secondary school. For RE she had to learn for six major religions, the founder, the holy book, what adherents are called and the name of the place they worship. Had Eliza had some inter-faith responsibility, she could cause great offence, mixing up Sikhism with Judaism and Buddhism. 

Sleep-over – home and away

Eliza

Eliza chose her birthday party to be an afternoon, evening, night and morning with her two best friends. They visited a craft cafe to make pots, ate ice cream and then back at home, watched tv and two videos, before the serious stuff of chatting in bed took hold. A word from L at 12.30am and they quietened down and slept until.. 7am when they soon had energy for indoor kickstone and spying on the rest of us.

Gabe

Gabe was invited to a sleep-over at his friend’s house the same night. The day before he mentioned that they would be playing Call of Duty, an 18 rated game. Not so fast, I said. Gabe was upset when L and I set our terms. he said there would be nothing for him to do there if he wasn’t allowed to play. The next day I called his host’s mother and said that he wasn’t allowed to play the game. She consulted with her son and called back saying, a little archly, they would find something ‘within the rules’.

He wasn’t effusive about the sleepover the next day. We seem to have found a fracture with some of our peers over their willingness (and our refusal) to let pre-teen children play violent video games. I wonder if Gabe mentioned to me the plan because of his discomfort with it.

Robin

Robin followed L into the loo and said it smelt of her. By which he meant it smelled of washing. Explaining more, he said I smell of rice – as I always make it; Eliza smells of ‘in my pockets’ – as she’s always playing with them; and Gabe smells of sweat – as he’s always playing football.