Posts Tagged ‘cookery’

Disorganised threesome

Gabe

Many school mornings become fraught around 8am when Gabe and Eliza are due to be leaving, but one or other, but usually Gabe is trying frantically to find something.. football socks… homework.. door-key. However, his most enervating practice is to state at 8pm on Monday that he needs ingredients for a food tech practical lesson the next day. His German tutor is due and so L and I are left to decide whether to send him to school without the materials for his GCSE class, or blink and go shopping for him. 

Eliza

Eliza conveys an impression of precision, yet there’s wooliness in there, too. Her violin went missing earlier this term. It had to be at home, she insisted, demanding search parties from the couch. Or it had to be in one of the cars. ‘Are you sure you’ve checked properly at school?’ L asked repeatedly. After two weeks, the instrument reappeared. It had been in a cupboard in th  music department. 

Robin

Robin’s disorganisation finds expression in a constant turnover of school PE kit and loss of letters home from school. He rarely ends a term with the same sports clothes he started with – losing, borrowing and acquiring as the terms goes on. The twenty minute walk home is enough time for important letters from school, with announcements of events and opportunities lost from (usually in the depths of) his school bag. Homework assignments also rarely make it back, meaning text appeals to other parents and a direct request to his teacher to publish the homework on the school website. 

Little Chef

Robin

Robin was at a loose end. The weather was wet. Football in the park in the morning hadn’t absorbed enough energy. “Read to Mummy while she’s making tea,” I suggested to no great approval.

Half-an-hour later, and he was standing on a chair at the stove, stirring the ‘rosetta’ (risotto) with a fixed stare and holding L’s hand. He had turned from reluctant assistant to insisting to be allowed to do everything. Over the meal, he announced that he would be making Sunday’s tea as well. And he did: vegetable pasta bake. He even got to slice the cauliflower (under close supervision). This time, he ate some of his creation.

Eliza

Eliza got out of bed and found me in Gabe’s room. Hiccups were stopping her from sleeping. I suggested she hold her breath. Tried, but hadn’t worked, she explained. “Well,” I said quietly “some people say you can get rid of hiccups if you get a FRIGHT!!!!” raising my arms and pretending to lunge at her. “Why did you do that?” she squealed. Then, after a few seconds: “I’ve stopped hiccupping.”

Gabe

Two weeks from the end of the Advanced coaching course run by Cheshire Cricket Board, I received an email to confirm that Gabe was invited to join the North District squad for a further ten weeks of coaching. Gabe was surprised and pleased, though did acknowledge that his batting was improving with the advanced course and his bowling was faster.

Development Centre exit

Robin

Week-by-week, for a whole year, Robin has been going to the Burnley FC development centre. We’ve never known when it will end, but it’s felt like it must be around the corner for most of those 12 months. Perhaps not for Robin, for whom it’s become part of his routine.

The end came suddenly. A training session brought to a close five minutes early. All the under eight players and parents gathered together and told that the Club had decided that the centre was for younger boys only. So, a whole age group, rather than individual boys, were dropped.

Robin has seemed to cope with the reverse. But when L, who was away the weekend it happened, asked him about it a few days later, Robin said he couldn’t talk about it and sealed her lips.

Eliza

Eliza played three instruments and four pieces at this year’s school musical soiree. Solo on piano and violin, and in a group for two recorder tunes. Each time she performed well, her commitment to practice paying off.

Gabe

Gabe’s technology class this term has been cookery. Each fortnight he has brought home very tasty morsels, including a pasta dish and bakewell tarts. The biggest challenge may be getting the ingredients. Firstly, remembering to tell L or me what he needs. Secondly, measuring out the quantities and packing them for school. This comes with the instruction that it should be done unaided by adults. This week, he was annoyed that he was marked down for his slow cleaning up despite, he believed, doing more than anyone else.