Posts Tagged ‘Cooking’

Summer term

Gabe

Gabe had a late birthday party, go-karting. Each of his five friends was at least as tall as I am. They filled the dining room and garden. At the race track they were installed in adult karts, unlike the birthday boy, who had a relatively under-powered junior vehicle.

Gabe has been doing food technology this term and it is one of his GCSE choices. Each Sunday evening, he announces that he must find his ingredients. Each Sunday evening, he is told it is too late and that he has had all week to sort out his shopping. We seem stuck in this cycle. I hope his GCSE lesson won’t take place on a Monday.

Eliza

Eliza had her induction day at the Grammar School. It went well. She liked her teacher; the same teacher as Gabe had in his first year at the school. She was also pleased to note that she wasn’t the shortest in her class.

Eliza’s year six play is a musical spoof of Robin Hood. She plays a village-idiot type character, with lots of jokey lines. But she knows almost the entire play, having a real facility for memorising dialogue. She has also taken to the catchy tunes which she has been singing around the house for weeks. The first performance went very well and she carried of her role successfully, speaking clearly and winning lots of laughs.

Robin

Robin has been doing swimming lessons at school, which he has been very keen on. He has learnt new strokes, had to swim in pyjamas and finished by completing a distance swim, although he couldn’t remember how many lengths were involved.

Advertisements

Little Chef

Robin

Robin was at a loose end. The weather was wet. Football in the park in the morning hadn’t absorbed enough energy. “Read to Mummy while she’s making tea,” I suggested to no great approval.

Half-an-hour later, and he was standing on a chair at the stove, stirring the ‘rosetta’ (risotto) with a fixed stare and holding L’s hand. He had turned from reluctant assistant to insisting to be allowed to do everything. Over the meal, he announced that he would be making Sunday’s tea as well. And he did: vegetable pasta bake. He even got to slice the cauliflower (under close supervision). This time, he ate some of his creation.

Eliza

Eliza got out of bed and found me in Gabe’s room. Hiccups were stopping her from sleeping. I suggested she hold her breath. Tried, but hadn’t worked, she explained. “Well,” I said quietly “some people say you can get rid of hiccups if you get a FRIGHT!!!!” raising my arms and pretending to lunge at her. “Why did you do that?” she squealed. Then, after a few seconds: “I’ve stopped hiccupping.”

Gabe

Two weeks from the end of the Advanced coaching course run by Cheshire Cricket Board, I received an email to confirm that Gabe was invited to join the North District squad for a further ten weeks of coaching. Gabe was surprised and pleased, though did acknowledge that his batting was improving with the advanced course and his bowling was faster.

Development Centre exit

Robin

Week-by-week, for a whole year, Robin has been going to the Burnley FC development centre. We’ve never known when it will end, but it’s felt like it must be around the corner for most of those 12 months. Perhaps not for Robin, for whom it’s become part of his routine.

The end came suddenly. A training session brought to a close five minutes early. All the under eight players and parents gathered together and told that the Club had decided that the centre was for younger boys only. So, a whole age group, rather than individual boys, were dropped.

Robin has seemed to cope with the reverse. But when L, who was away the weekend it happened, asked him about it a few days later, Robin said he couldn’t talk about it and sealed her lips.

Eliza

Eliza played three instruments and four pieces at this year’s school musical soiree. Solo on piano and violin, and in a group for two recorder tunes. Each time she performed well, her commitment to practice paying off.

Gabe

Gabe’s technology class this term has been cookery. Each fortnight he has brought home very tasty morsels, including a pasta dish and bakewell tarts. The biggest challenge may be getting the ingredients. Firstly, remembering to tell L or me what he needs. Secondly, measuring out the quantities and packing them for school. This comes with the instruction that it should be done unaided by adults. This week, he was annoyed that he was marked down for his slow cleaning up despite, he believed, doing more than anyone else.

Bake-off

Gabe and Eliza had reached stalemate, vetoing each other’s wishes for how we could spend the afternoon while Robin was at a party. From one, quickly supported by the other, came the idea of cooking: a bake-off, like on television. They consulted recipe books, chose different sweets and drew up a shopping list. I was to decide the winner, and the thing I wasn’t allowed to do was call it a draw.

The baking took hours as they struggled with cracking eggs, chopping chocolate and whisking, while I only participated when heat or sharp knives were involved. The floor and kitchen surfaces were covered with detritus from the chocolate chip cookie and chocolate brownie making. The spoils came out of the oven while they had tea. I marked them on independence, clearing up and taste. Gabe’s brownies won by a single point.

    Robin

Robin, perhaps returning to school after the Easter holidays, has shown a little more vulnerability than usual. A couple of nights he became upset, saying he couldn’t fall asleep and that his mouth was too small to yawn, which he showed with a fish-like gulp at the air. Another night, a book he had read with L about Planet Earth had made him fear falling off and into space. And in the playground in the morning he has clung to L or me, resisting the entry to his classroom.