Posts Tagged ‘gymnastics’

Bedroom cricket

Gabe

Gabe and Robin invented the format during the summer holiday – a concession to activity when they were at their most idle. The three of us play (Eliza and L, on occasions, too) but more commonly now it’s Gabe and me. The playing area is the length of Robin’s bedroom. We use a windball and a size 2 bat. Most ingeniously, the stumps are a pair of jeans hung from mattress tipped on its side.

Robin’s carpet makes the game. It takes turn – Warne-like turn for the well-spun delivery. And, given that there is no straight-arm restriction on ‘bowling’ the game is all about turning the ball, or as a batsman, countering that turn. 

Robin

Returning home from work, it might be thirty minutes before Robin registers my presence and appears. Usually, he’s in the living room or his bedroom, interacting with his phone. Recently, I reminded him that when he was younger he would run to the hall when he heard me come in the door from work and hug my knees. “Really?” He said. “I’ll do that again.” True to his word, last week, one evening as I came in the front-door, Robin burst from the living room and hugged me. Possibly, a little ironically, but appreciated nonetheless. 

Eliza

Eliza hosted a sleepover of gymnastics friends. It followed a gymnastics evening, which may have raised hopes that the girls would be tired. We set up two single and a double mattress for the five friends to sleep on in the living room. The rest of the family went upstairs to bed. The girls’ chatter and laughter carried on. Around midnight, the first text from upstairs was sent to Eliza, instructing her to quieten her guests. More agitated texts followed as the hours passed. Eventually, after 3am there was silence in the house.

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100 great goals

Robin 

Every night, for months, Robin has chosen, before sleep and after L or I have read to him, to read from a book that describes 100 great goals. A short description of the action is leavened with some information about the scorer or the occasion. There’s also a diagram of the movement of players and ball on its way into the net.

When sleep is about to smother him, Robin tosses the book from his bed. In the morning, it lies on the floor, crumpled. Its hardback cover fell off weeks ago. Its binding can’t hold for long. But even if it does disintegrate it has lodged itself in Robin’s memory. He knows the goals and scorers by number (1 to 100). He can even recite some of the reports if given a scorer’s name or goal number. 

Eliza

‘My palm has five layers of skin left,’ Eliza explained on the way home from gymnastics. Intensive work on the bars in recent weeks has worn a tear in the skin of her hand. She has been practising a manoeuvre that involves a complete rotation on the higher bar. To achieve this safely while in the learning phase, her hands are bound to the bar. It’s from that friction that the skin on her palms is torn away.

Gabe 

The election result has been welcomed by Gabe. At school, Corbyn is a hero. Gabe is dissatisfied by my position that neither major party leader is a fit PM. ‘What have I got against Corbyn?’ I was asked often during the campaign, as well as, who are you going to vote for and why? On election night, he sat with Lou and I as the TV guests and presenters toyed with the unlikely exit poll. Around midnight, with four GCSE exams the next day, he conceded that is was time for bed. 


Fitness app

Gabe

Tied to his tablet, gaming or in constant communication with friends. But Gabe also has an app that amongst other things, predicts how tall he will grow. It has a fitness regime that he is trying to follow. The wider motivation is his interest in his appearance, itself driven by girls and girlfriend. More narrowly, he wants a six pack like Robin. He’s asked me to join him with the regime, which I hope to do.

Robin

Robin has a verbal habit that frustrates: “Daddy [Mummy] said I could..” he will assert when arguing he should be allowed to do something. What he is invariably referring back to is a conversation where he has raised something he wants and L or I has said, ‘No’ or ‘maybe’ or ‘we’ll see’, but Robin selectively remembers it as support for him getting what he wants.

Eliza

Eliza is practising hard for a gymnastics manoeuvre that involves a handstand entered through half a cartwheel, from which she does the splits and then lowers herself into a half-lever, and then to the ground. She’s achieved it a dozen times, but attempted it hundreds. These practices take place on grass. The real thing is to be done on a beam.

Packed schedule

Eliza

Eliza has had an exhausting week of music, sport and school commitments. Monday: cricket practice. Tuesday: early morning orchestra, gymnastics. Wednesday: open evening visit to potential future secondary school, gymnastics grade exam. Thursday: early morning orchestra, school concert (1st violin and recorder group). Friday: piano lesson. All week, she has also been doing end of year tests in school. She comes out of the week with a pass on her gymnastics exam and a successful concert.

Robin

Robin has been accruing cricket achievements. Two wickets in two balls and three in an over. Four run outs in an innings. Dearest to me was the simple fact of appearing in a match with Eliza and opening the batting together.

Gabe

Gabe has been viewing the World Cup intermittently. The TV has been on and he’s in the room. But his attention has been divided across devices (I do the same, too). His new tablet is in front of his face, on snapchat or a game. It is pulled away to take in action replays or live action when the commentator’s voice, crowd noise or something else draws his attention.

Zit

Gabe

Amongst Gabe’s contemporaries, puberty is showing itself in grand growth spurts (height and foot size), yoyoing voices and deteriorating skin. Gabe remains small and slight, almost completely unsullied yet by the hormone assault – but not wholly so. A spot has erupted on his chin. It could have come and gone without mention, but he’s picked it and it sits splayed across the skin below his mouth. There’s so much more of this to come.

Eliza

The annual gymnastics club championship is the sole competitive focal point of Eliza’s year. She prepared assiduously for her floor routine, supplementing the twice weekly practice with time at home. Vault, beam and bars could only be rehearsed at the gym. On the night, a girl one year older was the outstanding gymnast in her class, but Eliza did well at bars, beam (completing a backward walkover) and vault (her least favourite discipline). And on the floor her practice paid off with a faultless display.

Yet, when the scores were read and medals awarded, she was placed for bars, vault and beam, but not for floor. She was ‘floored’ and upset, not really consoled by a third place overall.

Robin

Robin and his best friend, A, are in different classes at school this year. They play together every break and nag to be at each other’s houses after school. Being with A was part of Robin’s decision not to play with the under 9 football team, but to practise with his under 8 age group. Wherever they are, they play some variant of football, sliding, diving and shooting.

Parents evening at secondary school

Gabe

L attended Gabe’s first secondary school parents evening. 10 teachers in an hour and a half. And this is (some of) what they said:

  • the IT teacher pulled out a picture of Gabe smiling and said, “this is what I see in my class. I wish I had a class of Gabriels”. Two other teachers said they wanted a class of him.
  • the history teacher said she wished Gabe could look after his book, but she couldn’t fault his work. “He has a great history mind.”
  • his form teacher said that “by year 10 he’ll be known throughout the school”.
  • the art teacher really hoped he would carry on with her subject.
  • the maths teacher said he was very good, “but not arrogant. If someone in the class gives an answer Gabe knows is wrong, he sits quietly as though puzzling how they reached that answer.”
  • the design and technology teacher said he “is on the steepest trajectory” in the class.

Eliza

Eliza had two days of assessments. On Wednesday she took a gymnastics grade, passing floor, beam, bars and vault and getting a merit overall for a score of 33/40.

The next day she took grade 1 piano. She has stuck to her practice schedule and was well prepared. Gabe tried helping her on the afternoon of the test, and effort that went awry and ended with him shouting and making her cry just before the test began. Her result is awaited.

Robin

Robin had a sleepless evening, coming downstairs four or five times claiming he couldn’t sleep. By mid-morning today, he said he was feeling sick and by mid-afternoon he had been sick. Five hours of throwing up and rushing to the toilet followed until he flaked out asleep.

Three finals

Gabe

Gabe played in three end of season cup finals. The first, with Sale Utd threatened to be a mismatch – top club v second bottom. Two minutes in and form was telling as Sale Utd were two goals down. But a battling performance for 58 more minutes saw the game end 2-1.

The two school finals brought a win and a loss. The former on penalties after a 1-1 draw.

Robin

Robin played his first cricket match on a damp and cold evening in Bowden. It was played in pairs cricket format. His highlight came with a wicket – bowled – with his second ball in competitive cricket.

Eliza

Eliza’s cool progression through her gymnastic disciplines came to a halt with the forward flip, which she hasn’t been able to do. Her mood was restored the following week when she managed her first back flick.