Posts Tagged ‘illness’

Copyright

Gabe

Gabe has knowledge and scepticism in abundance. Yet belief in Father Christmas has survived well into his tenth year. Today he asked L whether Santa would bring something as expensive as a DS game. L said he probably wouldn’t. Suddenly Gabe’s knowledge burst in: how can Santa get over the copyright problem of making and giving DS games. Do parents give the presents, he suggested. L, suppressing laughter at the proto-lawyer’s concern for intellectual property, failed to apply the coup de grace and innocence was preserved.

Eliza

Eliza has written her letter to Santa:

Dear Father Christmas I would really like… a neclase that is the same as my other one but if there isnt the same one just one that is like it. And because I lost the ring that you gave me last time can I have a butterfly ring please. And can I have a few chocolates. And can I have a new cup for my lunch box. Love from Eliza

Eliza responded to Robin’s 25 metre badge by earning her 50 metre badge three days later.

Robin

Robin took the day off school. A temperature, a headache, but nothing very serious. While I managed my work emails, Robin sat in the kitchen drawing the Spanish football team. Eleven little figures, each with spiky hair, jazz hands, cylinder bodies and stick legs, distributed across three sheets of A4, playing under two suns; ten with red shirts and blue shorts and one all in green.

4-3-3 formation

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15 minute poet

Gabe

Gabe knocked off the following poem for his homework in a little over 15 minutes under pressure of missing something on tv.

About Reflection:
Reflection means being quiet
and thinking about the past
Regretting when you told your mate
that your were really fast,
Remembering the day
that you won your first medal,
Telling mum and Dad
that you broke the piano pedal,
But most importantly of all
Reflection means,
Remembering those happy days
when you didn’t eat your greens!

Eliza

For the past few weeks, Eliza’s pale, thin body has been dotted with moluscum – small warts. They’ve clustered at the tops of her legs and their itchiness can make her miserable. They are becoming redder, which may mean they’re about to subside.

Robin

Robin wore his new school shirt, shorts and shoes to pick up Gabe and Eliza from school on Friday – a few days before he starts in reception. He skipped down the road from the infant school, tripped and thudded his head on the pavement. A graze and a bump remain on his forehead.

Messi-Kaka

Gabe

Gabe celebrated his 9th birthday with 7 friends, me and another Dad at lazer quest. His nom de jeu was MessiKaka, eschewing the superhero and shoot’em up names on offer. The boys also took on the climbing wall – a 10 foot high construction with a wall rotating like an upright caterpillar track, which speeds up and tips from near vertical to beyond vertical. Gabe and his friends were tough and determined, clinging on and climbing longer than I would have imagined. A noisy burp-fest of a birthday tea comprising pizza and fizzy drinks concluded a good humoured party.

The previous night Gabe played his first competitive game of cricket. He bowled well, picking up a wicket and having some close shaves. His highlight was a catch on the square leg boundary, taken coolly.

Eliza

Eliza showed her political colours (at least, those of her teacher), when she asserted during the election campaign that she wanted Gordon Brown to win as the others would close down schools.

Robin

Robin endured a brief bout of sickness. When struck for the first time, he showered the entrance to Gabe’s school. Back at home, each time he was sick, even when in bed, he managed to dash to the toilet. He stayed stoical throughout.

Several days later, L was hit by something similar. Robin lay in bed next to her. He advised her that, if she felt sick, she should run really fast to the toilet.

Kingdom of Fife

Robin

Robin’s affection for his Grandpa and Grandma during our stay with them was deeply touching. Soon after arriving, he asked Grandpa to bend down, and then kissed him when his face came close. He pulled up his shirt to have his tummy tickled with Grandpa’s beard. He ran up to both grandparents to give them hugs and told Grandma she was the best grandma in the world. He sobbed when we drove away.

Gabe

Gabe was put out that Robin would be joining us for a game of football on the East Sands. With Gabe’s running impeded by a chest cough, Robin ran to fetch balls thumped across the sand. He passed and shot at Gabe’s prompting. For almost an hour we shared the simple pleasures of kicking, dribbling and running after a ball on damp sand. Gabe told me, by way of apology for his initial ill-temper: “I never knew I could have so much fun with Robin.”

Eliza

While the males played footie, Eliza immersed herself in beach art. Using a child’s plastic rake, she gently brushed and coaxed the sand into a large, lop-sided heart, beside which, in italic lettering she wrote ‘mummy’.

After nearly an hour on the beach, I lead the kids to the playground. Soon they had invented games for the hammock swing and rope roundabout, which unleashed an unselfconscious noise of shouts, giggles and whoops. The other families around the playground looked away from their kids to watch mine.

Phomephing to phuck

Robin

From two binkies to none – in one week. The children had their first visit to a new dentist, who looked in Robin’s mouth and discerned a dummy user. If he doesn’t stop now, the dentist warned, the boy will need orthodontic braces later. Robin was shocked by the possibility of ‘spiky phings’ in his mouth. He went to bed without his binky that night, but woke up with one. The binkies have now been hidden and he’s had two nights without, but woke clamouring for one before dawn. “I want phomephing to phuck”, he moans.

His diction may also improve.

Eliza

Six weeks into year one and Eliza’s parents’ evening was held. Miss Evans was full of praise for Eliza: phonics [not sonics] with year 2; reading age of 6 years + 8 months; great writing; good at mental arithmetic; quiet in class, but comfortable to contribute to group discussions – and a lovely pupil.

Gabe

Gabe has non-infectious conjuctivitis. He has become obsessed with knowing if his eyes are red – the questioning has supplanted, for now, his evening routine of demanding to know if he looks tired. If his eyes are red, and he’s told, he tends to melt down – the sobbing having the effect of making his already sore eyes, red and puffy.