Posts Tagged ‘teeth’

100 sit-ups

Gabe

Starting early in the month, Gabe began doing nightly sit-ups, increasing by five each time. He reached his target of 100 sit-ups, without a break, showing a determination in the face of pain. His overall goal is to develop a six-pack.

Robin

With his target in sight, Gabe decided that he would complement his daily dose of sit-ups with a timed plank. On the evening he reached his century, all five of us gathered in the living room for a family plank. L & I were the first to break, around the one minute mark. Gabe followed, his core already thoroughly exercised by sit-ups. Eliza reached three minutes and Robin went on and on. He seemed in such little discomfort I was suspicious his knees were touching the floor – they weren’t. Finally, at seven minutes he buckled.

Eliza

Eliza’s two most recent milk teeth to come out have done so in halves. The adult teeth underneath have pushed the milk teeth up and fractured them, leaving Eliza with a sharp half-tooth stuck to her gum. It’s taken up to a week for the second half to fall out.

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Sixth birthday; first tooth lost

Robin

Robin marked his sixth birthday by losing his first tooth. It fell out in the day, letting him avoid having to negotiate his birthday pizza with a very wobbly tooth. His party was in the leisure centre and involved games of football and play on a bouncy castle.

Gabe

Gabe can seem mature for his age: chatting to dads at Robin’s football about City and United. And he can seem naive: not really up to speed with his friends in the car on the way to football practice, as they talk about asking girls out, wrestling and taunting each other.

Eliza

Eliza didn’t make it into the school choir. But she always has a song on the go, which gets sung repeatedly. Right now, we hear the first three lines of Ain’t no mountain high enough over and over again.

Slow eater

Eliza

Eliza eats food slowly if she doesn’t like it, spinning out the meal, hoping to be spared it. Eliza eats food slowly if she does like it, savouring and delighting in it. Eliza’s slow eating can be because she gets distracted, by chit-chat or by a game. It may even be because she has a small  mouth, or is missing teeth – but she ate slowly with a full mouth of teeth, too. Ice cream cornets have posed a particular challenge. Her favourite food can be lost if too much time is taken over it. This she has finally grasped, but still every cornet is a cliff-hanger.

Robin

With the end of summer, Robin’s junior football practice has moved inside. Robin has been insistent that he doesn’t want to play indoors and was refusing to go. His motivation, it seems, had been to get boots with studs, which couldn’t be worn inside. He wanted to know when he could get them and asked to look at catalogues of boots on the computer. L turned up an old pair of Gabe’s, three sizes too large. Robin enthused over them. He disappeared from the kitchen to hold them, look at them, stroke them. I tied the laces for him to wear them in the garden. He padded around, not quite tripping over his clowns’ feet, scuffing the football.

This morning, heavy rain and more forecast convinced Robin to return to football indoors. He scored, enjoyed himself and may be reconciled to waiting until his feet grow until he returns to the football field.

Gabe

After our successful trip to Rome, L and I have talked to the children of doing something similar next year. Gabe wants control and has been regularly checking the Eurocamp website to check possible venues. He calls us into the study to see the latest perfect site he has found, pointing out the pool or, maybe recognising his audience, the landscape in which it is found. All the time trying to get commitments from his non-committal parents that this is where we will be going.

Gappy smiles

mind the gap

Eliza & Gabe

Eliza lost one of her top front teeth eating corn on the cob. There was sobbing, a little blood spat into the sink, a tiny white tooth and soon a gappy smile. It annoyed Gabe, as it meant that Eliza had overtaken him in the number of milk teeth lost (3 v 2). He regained the lead three days later, when both his top front teeth were extracted at the dentist’s. They had remained in place despite the arrival in front of them, shark-like, of one new adult tooth. Injections were used to numb Gabe’s mouth. His struggles in the face of the needles were easily suppressed by the dental nurse.

Robin

Robin sits at a developmental crossroads – wanting to tell us a story runs forwards, but crossing that route comes remembering what has actually happened. When butter was found splattered on the kitchen floor, he denied involvement. Under closer questioning, a story of knocking the tub from the shelf tumbled out. It fitted the facts. But last week, he came downstairs after bedtime complaining of crumbs in his bed. And his sheet was covered in granules – from toast eaten in his bed, he said. They weren’t crumbs, however, but grit or sand, for which he had no explanation.